• Breastfeeding Brings a Heart Bonus for Mom May 20, 2019 - SUNDAY, May 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Breastfeeding's benefits seem to stretch well beyond motherhood: New research suggests it may reduce a woman's risk of heart disease when she's older. And the longer a woman breastfeeds, the lower the risk. In the study, researchers assessed heart and blood vessel health ... Read more »
  • Swallowed Batteries Should Be Removed to Avoid Stomach Damage: Study May 19, 2019 - SATURDAY, May 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors might want to be more aggressive about treating children who swallow a button battery and appear to be out of danger, a preliminary study suggests. The small, round batteries -- found in everything from watches to remote controls to toys -- have ... Read more »
  • Health Tip: Helmet Safety May 18, 2019 - (HealthDay News) -- A helmet can prevent someone from a serious head injury, says the New York State Department of Health. Some states even require people, especially children, to wear helmets while biking or skateboarding. The Department of Health encourages parents to: Select a helmet that meets Consumer Product Safety ... Read more »
  • Health Tip: Physical Milestones at Age One May 18, 2019 - (HealthDay News) -- Clues about your child's physical development can be found in the way the child moves and plays, says the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. By the age of 1, the CDC says most children can: Get into a sitting position without help. Walk while holding ... Read more »
  • Health Highlights: May 17, 2019 May 18, 2019 - LED Blue Light Poses Eye, Sleep Risks: Report Undeclared Soy in Some Salads, Wraps at Whole Foods Markets Salmonella Outbreaks Linked to Backyard Poultry: CDC Bill Banning Abortion at 8 Weeks Passed by Missouri Senate
  • For Women With HIV, Daily Life Can Impede Fight Against Virus May 18, 2019 - FRIDAY, May 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Day-to-day struggles prevent many American women with HIV from taking medicines to suppress the AIDS-causing virus, a new study shows. "Survival is a priority over putting a pill in your mouth for a number of our participants, and that is the public health ... Read more »
  • Essentials for Growing Tasty Herbs on Your Windowsill May 18, 2019 - FRIDAY, May 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Whether you have a dedicated space in an outdoor garden or just a few buckets on a small patio, there's nothing quite like having your own herb garden for giving your cooking fresh flavor boosts. But what if you live in an apartment ... Read more »
  • What to Do When Your Child Throws a Fit May 18, 2019 - FRIDAY, May 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- You know the scenario -- your child has a meltdown, leaving you frustrated, embarrassed and arguing even though your brain says it's a battle you're not likely to win. Tantrums often start during the "terrible 2's" because little ones can't yet clearly voice ... Read more »
  • Many Elite Athletes Ashamed to Seek Help for Mental Illness May 18, 2019 - FRIDAY, May 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Athletes are supposed to be strong and self-assured, so many don't seek help for mental health issues, a new study finds. It's not just the stigma of mental illness that prompts many to tough it out alone, but also busy schedules, gender stereotyping ... Read more »
  • AHA News: Drummer’s Death Inspires Grief-Stricken Bandmates to Rethink Rock ‘n’ Roll Lifestyle May 18, 2019 - FRIDAY, May 17, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- When the members of the hard rock band Hellyeah walked onstage for their first show in more than a year, everything looked different. The most glaring change was the absence of famed drummer Vinnie Paul Abbott, who died suddenly in June ... Read more »
  • Colon Cancer Increasingly Striking the Young Worldwide May 18, 2019 - FRIDAY, May 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The rise in colon cases among younger adults that's been seen in the United States is also occurring in wealthier nations worldwide, new research shows. In the decade leading up to 2014, the number of cases of colon cancer among people under 50 ... Read more »
  • Could Hypnotherapy Be Alternative to Opioids for Pain? May 18, 2019 - FRIDAY, May 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Hypnosis might sound like a magic trick to some, but the therapy can be an effective pain reliever, a new review shows. The review covered 85 studies that have tested hypnosis for easing "experimental models" of pain -- that is, lab studies where ... Read more »
  • When E-Cig Makers Offer Promotional Items, More Teens Likely to Vape May 18, 2019 - FRIDAY, May 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Coupons, samples, branded hats and T-shirts: When teens use or wear promotional items from companies that make alternative tobacco products like electronic cigarettes, they are more likely to try those products, new research shows. The study included 757 California teens, aged 13 to ... Read more »
  • Suicides Increase Among U.S. Kids, But More in Girls Than Boys May 18, 2019 - FRIDAY, May 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Suicide rates are on the rise among American children, but the increase is greatest among girls, a new study finds. "Overall, we found a disproportionate increase in female youth suicide rates compared to males, resulting in a narrowing of the gap between male ... Read more »
  • Sugary Drinks and Fruit Juice May Increase Risk of Early Death May 18, 2019 - FRIDAY, May 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Most folks know that sugary drinks aren't healthy, but a new study finds fruit juices are not much better. In fact, consuming them regularly may help shorten your life, researchers say. "Older adults who drink more sugary beverages, which include fruit juice as ... Read more »
  • Love the Smell of a Cup o’ Joe? Here’s What That Reveals About You May 18, 2019 - FRIDAY, May 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Java junkies can sniff out even tiny amounts of coffee, and the more they drink, the better they can smell it, British researchers say. It's a discovery with powerful implications for treating people addicted to substances with a distinct smell. "The higher the ... Read more »
  • Health Tip: Signs of Binge Drinking May 17, 2019 - (HealthDay News) -- Intoxicated people are prone to poor decision-making, loss of emotional control and accidents. When people habitually binge drink, serious problems often arise. The American Addiction Centers mentions signs of binge drinking: Drinking excessively on weekends or holidays. Drinking more alcohol than originally intended. Engaging in risky behavior ... Read more »
  • Health Tip: Preventing Ringworm May 17, 2019 - (HealthDay News) -- Ringworm is a fungal infection that gets its name from the red circular rash that develops. The inside of the ring typically is clear or scaly. People who use public lockers and showers, athletes and people with weak immune systems are especially at risk. To prevent the ... Read more »
  • Health Highlights: May 16, 2019 May 17, 2019 - Bill Banning Abortion at 8 Weeks Passed by Missouri Senate Transgender Man Has Stillbirth After ER Nurse Disregards Abdominal Pains North Carolina Sues E-Cigarette Maker Juul Americans' Dirty Pool Habits Revealed in Survey Tattoo Inks Recalled Due to Bacterial Contamination
  • How to Exercise on ‘Rest and Recovery’ Days May 17, 2019 - THURSDAY, May 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Taking a day off from a favorite exercise doesn't mean spending the time sitting on the couch. In fact, getting some R&R has a special meaning when it comes to exercise: Rest and recovery. Recovery is everything that happens after the end of ... Read more »
  • The Top 5 Fruits to Add to Your Diet May 17, 2019 - THURSDAY, May 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Ounce for ounce and calorie for calorie, leafy greens and other types of vegetables are the hands-down favorites for delivering on nutrients. But many fruits should also have a place at the table. Researchers looked at the most nutrient-dense fruits and vegetables to ... Read more »
  • Low Birth Weight Babies a Worldwide Problem May 17, 2019 - THURSDAY, May 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- More than 20 million babies are born across the globe weighing far less than they should, and the problem isn't limited to low-income countries, new research shows. In 2015, nearly three-quarters of infants with low birth weight (less than 5.5 pounds) were born ... Read more »
  • Scientists Spot Unexpected Player in Fibromyalgia May 17, 2019 - THURSDAY, May 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Fibromyalgia is a mysterious and misunderstood illness, but researchers may have uncovered at least one key to the disease's origin: insulin resistance. The new research compared a small group of people with fibromyalgia to two groups of healthy people and noted that a ... Read more »
  • Sudoku, Crosswords Could Make Your Brain Years Younger May 17, 2019 - THURSDAY, May 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Mornings spent figuring out Sudoku or finessing a crossword could spell better health for aging brains, researchers say. In a study of over 19,000 British adults aged 50 and over who were tracked for 25 years, the habit of doing word or number ... Read more »
  • Bedbugs Date Back to T. Rex’s Time May 17, 2019 - THURSDAY, May 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Bedbugs have a long history, all the way back to the dinosaur age, a new study says. British researchers said bedbugs evolved more than 100 million years ago and were around when dinosaurs were in charge. "To think that the pests that live ... Read more »
  • AHA News: Study Finds Higher Risk of Stroke-Linked Plaque in Men, Possible Test for Women May 17, 2019 - THURSDAY, May 16, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Men are more likely than women to develop unstable plaques in their neck arteries, a dangerous condition that can lead to strokes, according to new research that also identified a helpful warning sign for rupture-prone plaques in women. The preliminary study, ... Read more »
  • Former President Jimmy Carter Leaves Hospital After Surgery for Broken Hip May 17, 2019 - THURSDAY, May 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Former President Jimmy Carter has been released from the hospital and is now recovering at home from surgery for a broken hip. Former First Lady Rosalynn Carter also had a health scare yesterday. According to a tweet from the Carter Center, she "felt ... Read more »
  • Lupus Takes Bigger Toll on Longevity for Blacks May 17, 2019 - THURSDAY, May 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Lupus, a chronic autoimmune disease that attacks the skin, joints and organs, can shorten the lives of its victims, but new research shows it can shorten the lives of black patients the most. Health data from two counties in Georgia found that black ... Read more »
  • Red Cross Needs Type O Blood to Ease Shortage May 17, 2019 - THURSDAY, May 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- There's a severe nationwide shortage of Type O blood, and the American Red Cross has issued an urgent appeal for donations. The current supply of Type O blood is critically low: Six units are available for every 100,000 people in the United States, ... Read more »
  • Pool Chemicals Harm Thousands Every Summer May 17, 2019 - THURSDAY, May 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Swimming pools are one of the great joys of summer, but U.S. health officials warn that the chemicals that keep the water pristine can land you in the ER. Between 2008 and 2017, there were more than 4,500 pool chemical-related injuries reported each ... Read more »
  • Less Pain, More Car Crashes: Legalized Marijuana a Mixed Bag May 17, 2019 - THURSDAY, May 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If Colorado is any indication, the legalization of marijuana does not come without health hazards. New research shows that while it led to a decline in hospitalizations for chronic pain, there were increases in traffic crashes, alcohol abuse and drug overdoses in the ... Read more »
  • Are Diets High in Processed Foods a Recipe for Obesity? May 17, 2019 - THURSDAY, May 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have long believed the obesity epidemic is at least partly related to the proliferation of highly processed foods. Now, new research suggests the connection is real. In a tightly controlled lab study, scientists found that people ate many more calories -- and ... Read more »
  • Weight-Loss Surgery May Work Even Better During Teen Years May 17, 2019 - THURSDAY, May 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The earlier you have weight-loss surgery, the better, a new study suggests. Researchers found that weight-loss surgery is more effective in reversing diabetes and high blood pressure in teens than in adults, which suggests it would be better for severely obese teens not ... Read more »
  • Heroin ODs Have Started Declining in Some States May 17, 2019 - THURSDAY, May 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- After years of steady increases, the number of Americans showing up in emergency departments with heroin overdoses is on a downswing, at least in some states. Between 2017 and 2018, many states saw a dramatic drop in the number of people being rushed ... Read more »
  • Health Tip: Treating a Charley Horse May 16, 2019 - (HealthDay News) -- "Charley horse" is another name for a muscle spasm or cramp of the leg. When a muscle cramps, it contracts involuntarily and does not relax. To treat a charley horse, MedlinePlus suggests: Stop activity. Try stretching and massaging the muscle. Use heat to relax the muscle initially, ... Read more »
  • Health Tip: Taking Care of Your Voice May 16, 2019 - (HealthDay News) -- Each year, about 18 million adults in the United States report problems with their voice, says the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. From singers to teachers, many people use their voice for work. To prevent chronic voice problems, the agency suggests: Don't abuse drugs. ... Read more »
  • Health Highlights: May 15, 2019 May 16, 2019 - Tattoo Inks Recalled Due to Bacterial Contamination U.S. Birth Rate Lowest in 32 Years Two-Thirds of Sunscreens Fail Safety Tests: Report Comedian Tim Conway Dies at Age 85 Exercise, Healthy Eating Can Reduce Dementia Risk: WHO
  • The Handy Tool for Healthy Chips May 16, 2019 - WEDNESDAY, May 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Want chips that deliver great taste without the typical additives in most packaged varieties? Then a food dehydrator is the kitchen appliance for you. At its core, a food dehydrator is a great way to preserve foods. Because it removes a food's water ... Read more »
  • Thriving in a Multi-Generational Home May 16, 2019 - WEDNESDAY, May 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you're part of a multi-generational home, you're in good company. The number of Americans living with two or more adult generations of one family rose during the last recession and has grown to an all-time high during the recovery. More than 64 ... Read more »
  • Quieter NICUs a Good Rx for Premature Babies May 16, 2019 - WEDNESDAY, May 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Shhhhh. Preterm infants can benefit from quiet times in hospital neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), a new study says. High noise levels are known to harm health, and infants in NICUs are especially vulnerable, so some NICUs have created quiet times to limit ... Read more »
  • Trans Women Have Raised Odds of Breast Cancer, But Risk Still Small: Study May 16, 2019 - WEDNESDAY, May 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Transgender women on gender-confirming hormone therapy have increased odds of breast cancer, but the overall risk is low and not as high as it is for the general female population, a new study finds. Trans women are those who were declared male at ... Read more »
  • AHA News: More Clues to the Genetics Behind an Inherited Cholesterol Disorder May 16, 2019 - WEDNESDAY, May 15, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- High cholesterol is a risk factor for heart disease, but not all forms of it are the same. An underdiagnosed genetic condition called familial hypercholesterolemia can cause dangerously high levels of cholesterol at an early age. While scientists have determined FH ... Read more »
  • Drier Winter Air May Propel Flu’s Spread May 16, 2019 - WEDNESDAY, May 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Ever wonder why the flu rarely strikes in the summer? New research offers an explanation: That dry air your heating system sends throughout your home in the winter weakens your immune system, making you a prime target for viral infection. Cold temperatures and ... Read more »
  • More Back-to-Back Heat Waves Will Come With Climate Change May 16, 2019 - WEDNESDAY, May 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Here's another health danger climate change will deliver in the coming years: New research warns that back-to-back heat waves that go on for days will become more common as the planet warms. The elderly and the poor will be the least prepared to ... Read more »
  • Anxiety Meds Like Valium, Xanax Could Raise Miscarriage Risk May 16, 2019 - WEDNESDAY, May 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnancy is often a time of heightened worry. But researchers warn that taking anti-anxiety drugs like Valium and Xanax may increase the risk of miscarriage. Called benzodiazepines, these powerful drugs have long been prescribed to treat a variety of mood disorders. However, a ... Read more »
  • Suspect Your Child Has an Ear Infection? There May Soon Be an App for That May 16, 2019 - WEDNESDAY, May 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Can a smartphone app spot an ear infection? It did so with high accuracy in new research. Ear infections occur when fluid builds up behind the eardrum and gets contaminated. Though an ear infection can hurt and make it hard to hear, sometimes ... Read more »
  • Curbing a Skin Oil Might Help Curb Acne, Study Suggests May 16, 2019 - WEDNESDAY, May 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Acne is the bane of many teens, and even some adults. Now, researchers say they might have hit on a new approach to easing the condition. The key lies in a naturally produced skin oil called sebum, explained a research team led by ... Read more »
  • Anthrax Is a Risk on Every Continent May 16, 2019 - WEDNESDAY, May 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- About 63 million people worldwide who work with livestock are in regions vulnerable to anthrax, according to a new study. And more than 1.8 billion people are at risk in those regions -- including rural areas in Europe, Asia, Africa and North America. ... Read more »
  • Millennials Believe ‘Narcissist’ Label, But Don’t Like It May 16, 2019 - WEDNESDAY, May 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Young Americans tend to accept the popular notion that their generation is self-centered and entitled, but they also resent those labels, new research suggests. In a series of surveys, researchers found that most people -- regardless of age -- believed the narcissistic stereotype ... Read more »
  • Lyme Disease Now a Threat in City Parks May 16, 2019 - WEDNESDAY, May 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As deer populations have exploded across America, moving from forests to suburbs to urban parks, they have brought the threat of Lyme disease to millions of city dwellers, a new study finds. In fact, the deer tick that spreads Lyme disease is as ... Read more »
  • Huhn? Scientists Working on Hearing Aid That Solves the ‘Cocktail Party’ Problem May 16, 2019 - WEDNESDAY, May 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Chances are if you're over 60 it's already happened to you: You're in a crowded room and finding it tough to understand what your partner is saying a couple of feet away. It's a longstanding hearing-loss issue known as the "cocktail party" problem. ... Read more »
  • Low-Fat Diet Could Be a Weapon Against Breast Cancer May 16, 2019 - WEDNESDAY, May 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Health experts have long touted the benefits of a low-fat diet for preventing heart disease, but now a large study suggests it might do the same against breast cancer. Researchers found that eating low-fat foods reduced a woman's risk of dying from breast ... Read more »
  • Glucosamine Joint Pain Supplement Could Help the Heart May 16, 2019 - TUESDAY, May 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Glucosamine has long been used as a supplement to help ease the joint pain of arthritis, but new research suggests its anti-inflammatory properties might also lower heart disease risk. The finding stems from a lifestyle survey involving more than 466,000 British men and ... Read more »
  • Health Tip: Walking Alone at Night May 15, 2019 - (HealthDay News) -- Though traveling with a friend or in a group is safest at night, walking alone may be unavoidable. The best practice for someone walking alone at night is to stay aware and to take precautions, says the University of California at Berkeley. The police department at UC ... Read more »
  • Health Tip: If You’re Lost Outdoors May 15, 2019 - (HealthDay News) -- Preparing for a safe hike outdoors begins with a few pieces of equipment. The American Hiking Society urges hikers to carry a map, compass and emergency whistle at all times. Furthermore, understanding how to use each item is critical. Despite preparations, hikers do get lost. If you're ... Read more »
  • Health Highlights: May 14, 2019 May 15, 2019 - Comedian Tim Conway Dies at Age 85 Exercise, Healthy Eating Can Reduce Dementia Risk: WHO California Couple Awarded $2 Billion in Roundup Lawsuit Locking Up Guns Could Save Many Children, Teens: Study U.S. Measles Cases in 2019 Reach 839: CDC Screen Legend Doris Day Dies at Age 97
  • Brighten Your Breakfast With a Lighter Blueberry Muffin May 15, 2019 - TUESDAY, May 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- There's nothing quite like the smell and taste of warm blueberry muffins. But when you buy them from a local bakery or your favorite coffee shop, they can clock in at 500 calories or more. Making your own is well worth the time, ... Read more »
  • Are You Running Short on Iron? May 15, 2019 - TUESDAY, May 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Could you -- or your teenage daughter -- have an iron deficiency and not know it? If you're getting enough sleep, but still feel tired, running low on iron could be the problem. Iron is our most common nutrient shortfall. A serious deficiency ... Read more »
  • Quantity, Not Type of Opioid Matters for Post-Op Dependency May 15, 2019 - TUESDAY, May 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As the United States struggles with a painkiller-abuse epidemic, researchers have found that it's the quantity of opioids prescribed after orthopedic surgery, not the type of opioid, that corresponds with long-term use. "One of the frequent myths we encounter among clinicians is that ... Read more »
  • Young, and Learning Too Late That Sun Safety Matters May 15, 2019 - TUESDAY, May 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The pain Sara Langill felt in her right hip didn't concern her much, until she felt a lump as she massaged tendons near her hip flexors following a soccer game. "I felt this thing that felt like a rubbery grape," recalls Langill, 33. ... Read more »
  • More Than 600,000 Opioid Abusers Raising Kids in U.S. May 15, 2019 - TUESDAY, May 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- They might be too young to abuse opioids themselves, but America's kids are suffering nonetheless because of their drug-dependent parents. New research shows more than 600,000 American parents with kids under 18 are addicted to opioids. That amounts to almost 1% of parents ... Read more »
  • Not All Sugars Are Created Equal May 15, 2019 - TUESDAY, May 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When it comes to sugars in food, you're far better off having a bowl of blueberries than a granola bar, a nutritionist says. Added sugars just aren't the same as natural sugars, noted Kara Shifler Bowers, a registered dietitian at Penn State PRO ... Read more »
  • AHA News: Dangerous Blood Clots May Be the Latest Risk From ‘Bad’ Cholesterol May 15, 2019 - TUESDAY, May 14, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- LDL cholesterol – the so-called "bad" cholesterol – is known to narrow arteries, which can lead to heart attacks and strokes. It's also now suspected of contributing to venous thromboembolism, new research suggests. The preliminary study, presented Tuesday at the American ... Read more »
  • AHA News: Why Are Women With Diabetes at Greater Risk for Poor Heart Health? May 15, 2019 - TUESDAY, May 14, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Diabetes can be a risk factor for heart disease – but for women, the condition can lead to worse outcomes than for men. The statistics are striking: Compared to their male counterparts, women with diabetes have a twofold increased risk of ... Read more »
  • Routine Use of Antibiotics May Help After Complicated Vaginal Birth: Study May 15, 2019 - TUESDAY, May 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly half of infections among women who undergo an assisted vaginal birth could be prevented by giving them a dose of antibiotics soon after delivery, a new study contends. The preventive use of antibiotics in these cases could prevent about 5,000 infections in ... Read more »
  • Philadelphia’s Soda Tax Tied to Big Drop in Sales May 15, 2019 - TUESDAY, May 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Soda taxes appear to be an effective weapon in the war on obesity and type 2 diabetes, a new study suggests. In January 2017, Philadelphia began taxing sugary and artificially sweetened drinks, and in that year their sales in chain food stores dropped ... Read more »
  • Brain Bleed Risk Puts Safety of Low-Dose Aspirin in Doubt May 15, 2019 - TUESDAY, May 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Let's say you're one of the millions of older adults who takes a low-dose aspirin religiously, in the belief that it will guard against heart disease and heart attacks. Now, a new review suggests your risk of a brain bleed outweighs any heart ... Read more »
  • Post-Hospital Low Blood Sugar a Danger to Diabetics May 15, 2019 - TUESDAY, May 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you are a diabetes patient, can having low blood sugar levels when you are discharged from the hospital be dangerous to your health? That's what a new study discovered: Those patients had a 40% increased risk of readmission and an increased risk ... Read more »
  • Parents, Here’s How to Protect Your Child During Measles Outbreaks May 15, 2019 - TUESDAY, May 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As measles outbreaks rage in many parts of the United States, one expert has advice for parents on how to protect their children from the disease. On Monday, U.S. health officials reported that measles cases have now climbed to 839 in 2019, the ... Read more »
  • Former President Jimmy Carter Breaks Hip, Has Surgery May 15, 2019 - MONDAY, May 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Former President Jimmy Carter is recovering from surgery for a broken hip after taking a fall at his home in Plains, Ga. Carter, 94, is the oldest living former U.S. president. In a statement, his office said that he underwent the hip surgery ... Read more »
  • Health Tip: Contact Lens Safety May 14, 2019 - (HealthDay News) -- Some 40 million Americans wear contact lenses to correct vision disorders, says the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. However, if not worn or taken care of properly, contact lenses pose risks to users. To avoid infection or injury, the FDA urges users to: Replace your contact lens ... Read more »
  • Health Highlights: May 13, 2019 May 14, 2019 - U.S. Measles Cases in 2019 Reach 839: CDC Screen Legend Doris Day Dies at Age 97 Washington State Could Be First to Offer Public Option Health Insurance Small Dogs From Iowa Breeder Have Disease That Can Be Passed to Humans Most on Cruise Ship Under Measles Quarantine Cleared to Leave
  • Weight-Free Strength Training May 14, 2019 - MONDAY, May 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- You don't have to go to the gym for a strength-training workout. With these three moves, your own body weight provides the resistance needed to develop key muscles. Start with the classic wall sit. Press your back into a wall and slide it ... Read more »
  • How to Cook With Luscious Lentils May 14, 2019 - MONDAY, May 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Lentils are super nutritious legumes that sometimes take a backseat to beans because they're not always as readily available and aren't sold precooked in cans like many beans are. But, unlike most dried beans, lentils don't need to be soaked overnight before using ... Read more »
  • Body Adapts, Recovers From Occasional ‘Pigging Out,’ Study Finds May 14, 2019 - MONDAY, May 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- It's almost time for long summer weekends and backyard barbecues. And you may be wondering if a day or two of burgers and beers does any long-term damage to your body. A new Australian study suggests that if you normally have a healthy ... Read more »
  • AHA News: This May Be Why Slashing Salt Lowers Blood Pressure May 14, 2019 - MONDAY, May 13, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Slash sodium from your diet. That's the advice inevitably given to everyone. Restricting sodium intake has been key to reducing blood pressure. Now researchers may have found an underlying mechanism to explain why. Scientists examined hundreds of metabolites substances produced during ... Read more »
  • Political Controversies Could Fuel Bullying of LGBT Youth: Study May 14, 2019 - MONDAY, May 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Heated political debate about the rights of marginalized groups might trigger increases in bullying, a new study says. It found that homophobic bullying at California schools peaked before a statewide referendum to ban gay marriage (Proposition 8), but declined after public debate about ... Read more »
  • Injured Lungs Can Be Regenerated for Transplant: Study May 14, 2019 - MONDAY, May 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Severely damaged lungs can be regenerated to be suitable for transplantation, researchers say. A transplant is the only lifesaving treatment for people with end-stage lung disease, but donor organs are in short supply. Up to 80 percent of donor lungs are rejected due ... Read more »
  • Heart Attack Rehab at Home Could Save Lives May 14, 2019 - MONDAY, May 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you had a heart attack and could get rehab therapy at home, would you be more likely to get the follow-up care that doctors recommend? A new scientific statement says you would, and advocates for the option to be more widely available ... Read more »
  • 2 of 3 Parents Read Texts While Driving May 14, 2019 - MONDAY, May 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Despite countless public service messages warning against texting and driving, more than two-thirds of parents have read a text while behind the wheel and roughly half have written a text while driving, a new survey finds. Millennial parents were more likely to report ... Read more »
  • Is That Prostate Cancer Worth Treating? Chromosomes May Tell May 14, 2019 - MONDAY, May 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- To treat, or not to treat: That remains one of the tough conundrums for men with prostate cancer and their doctors, because some tumors may be aggressive, while others may take decades to cause harm. Now, new research suggests that tracking specific changes ... Read more »
  • Looking to Whales for Insight on Human Cancers May 14, 2019 - MONDAY, May 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Whales, the gentle giants of the ocean, may offer clues on fighting cancer in humans, researchers say. Age and weight are known cancer risk factors. So it would seem that whales -- which include some of the largest and longest-lived animals on Earth ... Read more »
  • Scientists Spot Chemical Signs of Suicidal Thoughts in Brains of Those With PTSD May 14, 2019 - MONDAY, May 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Imagine if brain scans could show whether someone with PTSD is on the verge of suicide. Sound too far-fetched to be true? Now, a small, new study suggests it's possible simply by tracking the way a common brain chemical is distributed across the ... Read more »
  • CBD — It’s Everywhere, But Does It Work? May 14, 2019 - MONDAY, May 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- You would have to be living in a cave to have missed the CBD craze that is sweeping across America: New products are cramming store shelves as the market explodes for what many Americans believe to be a miracle cure-all. Everything from oils ... Read more »
  • 1 in 4 American Workers Struggles With Back Pain May 14, 2019 - MONDAY, May 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If your back aches while on the job, you have plenty of company: New research shows that nearly 40 million American workers suffer from chronic lower back pain. In all, that's more than a quarter of the workforce reporting lower back pain severe ... Read more »
  • Keeping Your Summer Fun on Sound Footing May 13, 2019 - SUNDAY, May 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When you're exercising this summer, don't forget to take care of your feet. "Foot health contributes to your overall health. From beginners to advanced athletes, proper foot care is important to keep your body healthy," said Dr. John Giurini, chief of podiatric surgery ... Read more »
  • Celebrating With a Bonfire? An Expert’s Guide to Keeping The Fun Safe May 12, 2019 - SATURDAY, May 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Bonfires are a popular way to celebrate big events among teens, but they're at risk for serious burn injuries, an expert warns. "The only guaranteed way to prevent bonfire burn injuries is to not have a fire in the first place," said burn ... Read more »
  • Health Tip: Insect Repellent Precautions May 11, 2019 - (HealthDay News) -- Insect repellents can help prevent bug bites. But it's important to take precautions when using them, says the City of New York. Precautions include: Follow the manufacturer's directions. Apply a light coat to exposed skin. Do not apply repellent to skin that is under clothing. Do not ... Read more »
  • Health Tip: Benefits of Fitness Boxing May 11, 2019 - (HealthDay News) -- Fitness boxing is a popular way for adults to stay fit. Unlike regular boxing, fitness boxing does not involve sparring, so there is no risk of head trauma, says Harvard Medical School. Instead, participants throw punches at the air or at a punching bag. Harvard mentions these ... Read more »
  • Health Highlights: May 10, 2019 May 11, 2019 - Gilead Donation of HIV Prevention Drug Gets Mixed Reaction Denver Voters Approve Measure to Decriminalize Magic Mushrooms HIV Diagnoses in U.S. Women Remain Much Higher in Blacks: CDC Trump Joins Fight Against Surprise Medical Bills
  • Homemade Mayonnaise Made Easy May 11, 2019 - FRIDAY, May 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- An immersion blender is one of the handiest tools you can have in the kitchen. Not only does it let you whip up a soup or sauce in seconds, it stores easily in a drawer. Put your immersion blender to work making homemade ... Read more »
  • How Much Protein Do You Need for Weight Loss and Muscle Growth? May 11, 2019 - FRIDAY, May 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Low-carb, vegetarian, Mediterranean -- whatever your diet, it's important to get enough protein. Although research hasn't yet pinpointed one perfect formula, experts say that the typical "recommended" daily minimums aren't optimal, and that it helps to factor in your weight and activity level ... Read more »
  • Cover Up! Don’t Soak Up Those Sun Rays May 11, 2019 - FRIDAY, May 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Only half of Americans routinely protect themselves from the sun when outdoors, a recent American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) survey found. Those who don't practice sun safety put themselves at increased risk for skin cancer, which is the most common cancer in the ... Read more »
  • ‘Robopets’ Bring Companionship, Calm to Nursing Home Residents May 11, 2019 - FRIDAY, May 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Cuddler the bear, Aibo the dog, Justocat the purring kitty: They may only be furry, lifelike robots, but they have a made a real impact in nursing homes. That's the finding of new British research that suggests these high-tech "robopets" are the next ... Read more »
  • Can Medical Marijuana Help Kids With Autism? May 11, 2019 - FRIDAY, May 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Medical marijuana extracts appear to help children with autism, reducing their disruptive behavior while improving their social responsiveness, a new Israeli clinical trial reports. Kids treated with either a whole-plant cannabis extract or a pure combination of cannabidiol (CBD) and THC experienced a ... Read more »
  • More Active Lupus Linked to Childhood Events May 11, 2019 - FRIDAY, May 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Lupus patients who had difficult childhoods have higher disease activity, worse depression and poorer overall health than those with better childhoods, a new study finds. Bad childhood experiences included abuse, neglect and household challenges. The study included 269 lupus patients in California. Of ... Read more »
  • Many Drug Abusers Use Family Members to ‘Opioid Shop’ May 11, 2019 - FRIDAY, May 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- People who are thwarted in their attempts to "shop around" for prescription opioid painkillers at doctors' offices and pharmacies may try to get the drugs via relatives as a last resort, researchers report. Some people who misuse opioids go to numerous prescribers and ... Read more »
  • Stay Safe While Spring Cleaning May 11, 2019 - FRIDAY, May 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- While it's a regular ritual, spring cleaning can become a dangerous chore for your health, experts warn. Some cleaning supplies -- air fresheners, rug cleaners, bleach, oven cleaners and floor polish -- have dangerous chemicals such as volatile organic compounds. These chemicals become ... Read more »
  • Signs of Rheumatoid Arthritis Can Show Up Long Before Diagnosis May 11, 2019 - FRIDAY, May 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Difficulties with daily activities such as dressing, walking and eating can be seen in rheumatoid arthritis patients a year or two before they're diagnosed, a new study shows. "This is a new finding, and a finding that is quite intriguing," said lead author ... Read more »
  • Do Doctors Give Better Care in the Morning? May 11, 2019 - FRIDAY, May 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many people do their best work in the morning, and new research suggests the same may hold true for doctors. The study, of nearly 53,000 primary care patients, found that doctors were more likely to order cancer screenings for patients seen early in ... Read more »
  • Is the County You Call Home a Potential Measles Hotspot? May 11, 2019 - THURSDAY, May 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Could a computer model pinpoint where measles outbreaks are likely to occur? That's exactly what researchers did, accurately predicting some of the U.S. regions where measles might spread. Their predictions included counties in New York, Washington state and Oregon, where measles outbreaks are ... Read more »
  • Health Tip: Safe Crafting for Kids May 10, 2019 - (HealthDay News) -- Though arts and crafts are fun activities for children, safety precautions should still be followed, says the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. Safety rules when children are using art materials include: Keep food and drinks out of the art area. Adults should mix powdered and dusty materials. ... Read more »
  • Health Tip: Treating Calluses at Home May 10, 2019 - (HealthDay News) -- Calluses are thick, hardened layers of skin. For healthy people, treatment is only necessary if a callus causes discomfort, says Mayo Clinic. Mayo suggests how to treat calluses at home: Use over-the-counter pads. Soak the area in water. Moisturize your skin. Wear comfortable socks and shoes. For ... Read more »
  • Health Highlights: May 9, 2019 May 10, 2019 - Trump Joins Fight Against Surprise Medical Bills Precision Medicine Finds Hidden Health Problems in Study Generic Version of HIV Prevention Drug Available in U.S. By Sept. 2020 FDA Approves New Drug for Rare Neuromuscular Disease Kentucky Teen Who Refused Chickenpox Vaccination Now Has Chickenpox Prices Will Soon be Included in ... Read more »
  • How to Soothe Baby’s Teething Pain Safely May 10, 2019 - THURSDAY, May 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Few things are as distressing as baby's cries when his or her first teeth are coming in, but it's important to know what not to use to soothe that pain. Over the years, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued warnings about ... Read more »
  • Drinking and Your Health: A Reality Check May 10, 2019 - THURSDAY, May 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The Mediterranean diet consistently tops the list of food plans that convey health benefits, and one reason many people like it is that it allows moderate amounts of red wine. But there's no definitive proof that wine or any form of alcohol should ... Read more »
  • Anger a Threat to Health in Old Age May 10, 2019 - THURSDAY, May 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The loss of loved ones can hit the elderly particularly hard, but a new study suggests it's anger, and not sadness, that may damage the aging body more. Anger can increase inflammation, which is linked with conditions such as heart disease, cancer and ... Read more »
  • Weight-Loss Procedure Works Long-Term, Without Surgery May 10, 2019 - THURSDAY, May 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Could people struggling with obesity make headway in their efforts to shed pounds without having to go under the knife? New preliminary research suggests it's possible: A non-surgical procedure may help moderately obese people lose weight -- and keep it off. Unlike standard ... Read more »
  • Fear of Dentist May Start Early for Minority Kids — With Good Reason May 10, 2019 - THURSDAY, May 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Not many children like going to the dentist, but minority kids may have some legitimate complaints, researchers suggest. A new study finds that poor kids, and Hispanic and Asian children, may be more likely to have bad experiences during dental visits than whites ... Read more »
  • ‘Zap’ Ear Clip May Ease A-Fib May 10, 2019 - THURSDAY, May 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Imagine if all it took to treat the heart condition atrial fibrillation was clipping a small device to your ear for an hour a day? That futuristic scenario could soon be a reality, according to a new study. In a small, early trial, ... Read more »
  • Take Steps to Prevent a Stroke May 10, 2019 - THURSDAY, May 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Strokes are common but not inevitable. There are ways you can reduce your risk, starting with your blood pressure. Stroke is the fifth leading cause of death in the United States and the leading cause of permanent disability, said Dr. Gary Bernardini, neurology ... Read more »
  • Does Removing Your Appendix Put You at Risk for Parkinson’s? May 10, 2019 - THURSDAY, May 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- It's a connection few have probably considered, but new research suggests that having your appendix removed may up your risk for Parkinson's disease down the road. The finding follows an analysis that examined health records for roughly 62 million patients. Of these, about ... Read more »
  • Brief EMS Training Saves Lives After Brain Injury May 10, 2019 - THURSDAY, May 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- All it takes is two hours of training to save a life after a severe head injury, researchers say. A new study reports that training first responders in emergency treatment guidelines for severe head injuries does improve chances of survival. The guidelines for ... Read more »
  • Potentially Blinding Shingles of the Eye on the Rise May 10, 2019 - THURSDAY, May 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The virus that gave you chickenpox as a kid can rise again after decades of inactivity and inflict a painful, even blinding, eye infection in old age. New research reveals that cases of eye-based "shingles" have tripled since 2004. Exactly what is driving ... Read more »
  • Summer Is Tough for Asthma Sufferers May 10, 2019 - THURSDAY, May 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Summertime can bring asthma sufferers a lot of misery, but lung experts say watching for warning signs of breathing trouble can guard against serious complications. "As the leading organization working to save lives by improving lung health, we think it's crucial for people ... Read more »
  • Psoriasis, Mental Ills Can Go Hand in Hand May 10, 2019 - THURSDAY, May 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Psoriasis is a chronic, inflammatory skin disease that is often coupled with depression, anxiety and even bipolar disease, schizophrenia and dementia, two new studies show. What is unclear, the researchers acknowledge, is which causes which. In the first study, Danish researchers collected data ... Read more »
  • Hepatitis A Infections Soaring: CDC May 10, 2019 - THURSDAY, May 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The number of Americans infected with hepatitis A has grown nearly 300% in just three years, health officials reported Thursday. The staggering increase has come despite an effective vaccine and is seen mostly among drug abusers and the homeless, according to the U.S. ... Read more »
  • Health Tip: Safe Dog Toys May 9, 2019 - (HealthDay News) -- Toys are key to your dog's well-being, since they can help fight boredom and provide comfort for your dog, says the Humane Society of the United States. The society offers these guidelines for pet owners: Do not let your dog play with string, rubber bands or other ... Read more »
  • Health Tip: Drink Enough Water May 9, 2019 - (HealthDay News) -- Without enough water, your body can't function properly, says the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Healthy people typically meet their fluid needs by drinking with meals and when thirsty. The CDC suggests: Carry a water bottle with you. Choose water instead of sugar-sweetened beverages. Choose water ... Read more »
  • Health Highlights: May 8, 2019 May 9, 2019 - Kentucky Teen Who Refused Chickenpox Vaccination Now Has Chickenpox Prices Will Soon be Included in TV Drug Ads Robert F. Kennedy Jr.'s Anti-Vaccine Views Slammed by Family Members Church of Scientology Cruise Ship Passengers and Crew Still Under Quarantine Eating Nuts During Pregnancy May Benefit Baby's Brain: Study British Having ... Read more »
  • STDs: A Serious Health Threat at Every Age May 9, 2019 - WEDNESDAY, May 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you're back on the dating scene after being in a monogamous relationship, know that STDs, or sexually transmitted diseases, aren't just a concern for teens and people in their 20s. STD rates are rising in older adults. STDs are usually caused by ... Read more »
  • Crunch-Free Work for Well-Defined Abs May 9, 2019 - WEDNESDAY, May 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- You don't have to do hundreds of sit-ups and all manner of crunches to see abdominal muscle definition. The following moves are done standing and holding a weight, such as a 5-pound ball with an easy-to-grip handle. For the standing twist, feet are ... Read more »
  • Airport Scanners OK for People with Implanted Heart Devices: Study May 9, 2019 - WEDNESDAY, May 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- It appears to be safe for people with implantable heart devices such as pacemakers and defibrillators to go through body scanners at airport security checkpoints, researchers say. Body scanners are becoming increasingly common worldwide. But some people are concerned that they may be ... Read more »
  • U.S. Improves Emergency Readiness, but Gaps Persist May 9, 2019 - WEDNESDAY, May 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The United States' ability to deal with major health emergencies quickly has improved significantly in recent years, researchers say. In 2019, America scored 6.7 on the 10-point National Health Security Preparedness Index. That's a 3.1% improvement over the last year, and up 11.7% ... Read more »
  • Americans’ Prescription Med Use Is Declining May 9, 2019 - WEDNESDAY, May 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Bucking a longstanding upward trend, new data shows that the percentage of Americans taking any prescription drug has fallen slightly over the past decade. Still, nearly half -- 45.8% -- of Americans said they took at least one prescription medicine over the past ... Read more »
  • Poor, Minorities Shortchanged on Opioid Addiction Treatments May 9, 2019 - WEDNESDAY, May 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When it comes to opioid addiction treatments, money and race matter, researchers say. White, wealthy Americans are much more likely to receive medication for their addiction than minorities and the poor, the new study found. Racial and financial differences have only grown wider ... Read more »
  • Weight-Loss Surgery Boosts Success of Procedure to Fix A-Fib May 9, 2019 - WEDNESDAY, May 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Profoundly obese people are prone to an irregular heartbeat known as atrial fibrillation, but new research suggests that weight-loss surgery can improve the odds that a procedure to restore a normal heart rhythm will work. When atrial fibrillation, or a-fib, cannot be controlled ... Read more »
  • New Treatment Guideline Focuses on Tourette Syndrome May 9, 2019 - WEDNESDAY, May 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Tourette syndrome can be a nerve-wracking condition, but there are effective treatments for sufferers, a new American Academy of Neurology guideline says. Tourette is a neurodevelopmental disorder that begins in childhood and causes involuntary vocalizations and repetitive movements known as tics. Accurate diagnosis, ... Read more »
  • After Concussions, Some Ex-Athletes Show Key Marker for Brain Disease: Study May 9, 2019 - WEDNESDAY, May 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- High levels of a protein linked with the brain disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) were found in the cerebrospinal fluid of ex-athletes who suffered multiple concussions, Canadian researchers say. The protein tau has been tied to CTE, a rare, degenerative brain disease believed ... Read more »
  • An Antibiotic Alternative? Using a Virus to Fight Bacteria May 9, 2019 - WEDNESDAY, May 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Viruses and bacteria are the culprits behind the infectious diseases that plague humans. Researchers recently turned one against the other, using viruses to wipe out a potentially life-threatening bacterium in a 15-year-old girl with cystic fibrosis. This old-time approach to battling bacterial infections ... Read more »
  • Do Adults Need a Measles Booster Shot? May 9, 2019 - WEDNESDAY, May 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- New York's ongoing measles epidemic alarmed midtown Manhattan resident Deb Ivanhoe, who couldn't remember whether she'd ever been vaccinated as a child. So Ivanhoe, 60, sought out her long-time primary care doctor, who performed an antibody test to see whether she had any ... Read more »
  • Window for Safe Use of Clot-Buster Widens for Stroke Patients May 9, 2019 - WEDNESDAY, May 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For years, many people suffering a stroke have not been able to get a critical drug due to time limits on its use. Now, a new study suggests that treatment time window can be doubled. Experts said the findings could open up the ... Read more »
  • Health Tip: When to Seek Medical Attention For a Cut May 8, 2019 - (HealthDay News) -- Cuts are openings in the skin and can be deep, smooth or jagged. Minor cuts may be treated at home, says MedlinePlus. However, in some instances you should contact a medical professional. Call 911 if: Bleeding is severe or cannot be stopped. The person cannot feel the ... Read more »
  • Health Tip: Paint Exposure First Aid May 8, 2019 - (HealthDay News) -- From acrylic to oil-based, most paints for indoor use are safe to use. But paint users should be aware of first aid for paint exposure, says the National Capital Poison Center. Poison Control suggests: Wash paint from the skin with soap and water. If paint gets into ... Read more »
  • Health Highlights: May 7, 2019 May 8, 2019 - Georgia Governor Signs Early Abortion Ban Melania Trump's 'Be Best' Children's Program to Expand Sharp Rise in Opioid Thefts by U.S. Health Care Workers: Report Denver Voters to Decide on 'Magic Mushroom' Decriminalization U.S. Measles Cases Reach 764
  • Can Social Media Lead to Eating Disorders? May 8, 2019 - TUESDAY, May 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Traditional media, including TV and magazine ads, tend to portray ideals of physical perfection that can fuel worries about body image and eating disorders. A study from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine found that spending hours on social media is linked ... Read more »
  • Three Ways to Improve Focus and Concentration May 8, 2019 - TUESDAY, May 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Do you get distracted easily or find that it's getting harder to stay focused on a task at hand or retain new information? These issues can happen to anyone, though they may seem to be more troublesome with advancing age. But concentration is ... Read more »
  • Well Water’s Spillover Effect: Heart Damage? May 8, 2019 - TUESDAY, May 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Does your home draw its water source from a well? A new study finds that well water may be injurious to heart health in young adults -- if it contains arsenic. "People drinking water from private wells, which are not regulated, need to ... Read more »
  • All That Twitter, Snapchat May Not Be Bad for Teens May 8, 2019 - TUESDAY, May 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Teens spend countless hours glued to their phones and tablets, continually posting to social media, but British researchers report that might not be as terrible as many parents may think. It appears that teens who are less satisfied with their lives do tend ... Read more »
  • Want to Save Money While Shopping? Leave Your Phone Home May 8, 2019 - TUESDAY, May 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Everyone knows about cellphones and the threat of distracted driving. But how about distracted shopping? Using your cellphone while shopping might make you susceptible to buying stuff you didn't intend to buy, a new study suggests. Researchers found that people who used cellphones ... Read more »
  • AHA News: Could Adding Minerals to Drinking Water Fight High Blood Pressure? May 8, 2019 - TUESDAY, May 7, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- If you have high blood pressure, chances are you've been told to cut back on salt. You might even be taking medication. These are good strategies, as nearly half of all adults in the United States work to keep hypertension at ... Read more »
  • Slowing Climate Change Could Cut Health Costs, Save Money May 8, 2019 - TUESDAY, May 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Tackling climate change makes economic sense, a new report claims. The cost of cutting carbon emissions -- enough to meet the goals of the Paris Climate Agreement -- would be offset by reductions in health problems and deaths caused by air pollution, the ... Read more »
  • Military Tourniquets Might Save Kids’ Lives During School Shootings May 8, 2019 - TUESDAY, May 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A new study finds that a tourniquet used in war zones could save students' lives when gun violence strikes a campus. The Combat Application Tourniquet (CAT), a cuff-like device that wraps around a limb to stop bleeding, was developed for adults, but this ... Read more »
  • Weight Before Pregnancy Most Important to Risk for Complications May 8, 2019 - TUESDAY, May 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Expectant mothers and doctors have focused a lot on how much a woman gains during pregnancy, but new research suggests how much a woman weighs before getting pregnant may be far more important. The study found that the more a woman weighed at ... Read more »
  • Is AI a New Weapon in Breast Cancer Detection? May 8, 2019 - TUESDAY, May 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Artificial intelligence is the hot new trend in medicine, and now new research suggests it could help doctors better predict a woman's breast cancer risk. The study is the latest to explore the potential role of artificial intelligence (AI) in medicine. Typically, it ... Read more »
  • Many Pregnancy-Related Maternal Deaths Occur Months After Delivery: CDC May 8, 2019 - TUESDAY, May 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Too many women still die from pregnancy-related causes, some up to a year after delivery, according to a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. About 700 pregnancy-related deaths occur in the United States each year, and 3 out ... Read more »
  • Shame Around Mental Illness May Be Fading, Survey Shows May 8, 2019 - TUESDAY, May 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Stigma regarding mental health could be disappearing in the United States, a new survey finds. In the online poll of more than 1,000 adults, 87% said a mental disorder is nothing to be ashamed of, and 86% said they believe that people with ... Read more »
  • Newer Diabetes Drugs Linked to ‘Flesh-Eating’ Genital Infection May 8, 2019 - MONDAY, May 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Say you have type 2 diabetes and you are taking a newer class of medications to treat your disease -- but one day you notice pain, redness and a foul odor in your genital area. If this happens, new research suggests you need ... Read more »
  • Health Tip: Reduce Excess Gas May 7, 2019 - (HealthDay News) -- Gas is air in the digestive tract, says the U.S. National Institutes of Health. Swallowing less air is a key way help reduce symptoms. For other ways to reduce excess gas, the NIH suggests: Eat slowly. Avoid gum and hard candies. Quit smoking. Eat smaller, more frequent ... Read more »
  • Health Tip: Metal Work Safety May 7, 2019 - (HealthDay News) -- Metalworking involves using metals to create parts, assemblies or large-scale structures. As a job that requires a unique set of skills, it provides special hazards, as well, says Cornell University. General metal work safety guidelines are: Wear eye protection at all times. Remove or secure jewelry, long ... Read more »
  • Health Highlights: May 6, 2019 May 7, 2019 - U.S. Measles Cases Reach 764 Congo Ebola Outbreak Death Toll Surpasses 1,000 Nearly 12 Million Lbs. of Chicken Strip Products Recalled by Tyson Possible Listeria Contamination in L'Explorateur Soft Ripened Cheese: FDA
  • A Tasty Twist on Pasta and Pesto May 7, 2019 - MONDAY, May 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Pesto is a delicious and fast pasta sauce. Because it can be made in advance and served cold, it's also a perfect do-ahead dish. The nuts used in traditional pesto are healthful, but whether almonds, walnuts or pine nuts, you may not always ... Read more »
  • How to Protect Your Child From Choking May 7, 2019 - MONDAY, May 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Eating solid foods is a milestone in your child's life. With the right precautions to reduce the risk of choking, you can make this a safe transition. Teach children to sit up straight from the earliest age. Always supervise mealtime. A choking child ... Read more »
  • Fentanyl Becoming a Deadly Accomplice in Cocaine, Meth Abuse May 7, 2019 - MONDAY, May 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As if using cocaine or methamphetamines isn't risky enough, new research shows a sharp spike in urine drug tests that are positive for those drugs and the powerful synthetic opioid fentanyl. The findings could provide insight into steeply rising rates of cocaine- and ... Read more »
  • The Surprising Lead Cause of Death for Pregnant Women May 7, 2019 - MONDAY, May 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A major medical group has issued new guidance on detecting and treating the leading cause of death in pregnant women and new mothers in the United States. Heart disease accounts for 26.5% of pregnancy-related deaths, and rates are highest among black women and ... Read more »
  • Many Kids With Chronic Illness Are Still Happy: Study May 7, 2019 - MONDAY, May 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many children deal with chronic health issues -- but it doesn't mean they can't enjoy life as much as other kids, a new study finds. Researchers found that among more than 1,200 5- to 9-year-olds, those with some of the most common childhood ... Read more »
  • AHA News: Helping Asian-Americans Fight Their Hidden Heart Risks May 7, 2019 - MONDAY, May 6, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- At first glance, Anh Vu Sawyer wouldn't appear to be someone at high risk for heart disease or stroke. But she'd be the first to say looks can be deceiving. "I have a very low body mass index, but I was ... Read more »
  • Pokeman Characters Linger in Brain Well Past Childhood May 7, 2019 - MONDAY, May 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Play plenty of Pokemon as a child, and your brain may tuck your favorite characters away in a special place where they are never forgotten. Researchers from Stanford University believe that's exactly what happened with a small group of adults they tested. "It's ... Read more »
  • Dispensing Opioid Antidote Without a Prescription Might Save Lives May 7, 2019 - MONDAY, May 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Opioid overdose deaths would decline dramatically if U.S. pharmacists could dispense the antidote naloxone without a doctor's prescription, a new study says. In states that have adopted such laws, opioid deaths fell an average of 27% in the year after passage and 34% ... Read more »
  • E-Cigarettes Used in 5% of U.S. Homes With Kids May 7, 2019 - MONDAY, May 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As e-cigarettes gain fans, children may be losing out. New research suggests that vaping parents expose children to secondhand fumes that may be as harmful as tobacco smoke. Nearly 5% of U.S. adults living with children use e-cigarettes, according to the study. And ... Read more »
  • Sunscreen Chemicals Enter Bloodstream at Potentially Unsafe Levels: Study May 7, 2019 - MONDAY, May 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For years, you've been urged to slather on sunscreen before venturing outdoors. But new U.S. Food and Drug Administration data reveals chemicals in sunscreens are absorbed into the human body at levels high enough to raise concerns about potentially toxic effects. Bloodstream levels ... Read more »
  • U.S. Heart Failure Rates Are Rising, Especially for Black Adults May 7, 2019 - MONDAY, May 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Most people are terrified of having a heart attack, but they might also need to worry about heart failure, particularly if they are black. After years of decline and despite treatment advances, the risk of dying early from heart failure-related causes started increasing ... Read more »
  • Quitting Smoking Helps Shield Women From Bladder Cancer: Study May 7, 2019 - MONDAY, May 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you're an older woman who smokes, quitting may bring a health benefit you haven't considered: A new study suggests it lowers your risk of bladder cancer. The largest decline in risk was in the first 10 years after quitting, with a modest ... Read more »
  • Use of Meds for Enlarged Prostate Might Delay a Cancer Diagnosis May 7, 2019 - MONDAY, May 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Men who take medicines for an enlarged prostate can have years-long delays in their diagnosis of prostate cancer and more advanced prostate cancer when they're diagnosed, a new study finds. The reason? Drugs in this class -- such as Proscar (finasteride) and Avodart ... Read more »
  • Does Hormone Therapy for Prostate Cancer Raise Dementia Risk? May 7, 2019 - SUNDAY, May 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When men with prostate cancer have to take drugs that block the testosterone fueling their tumors, they can suffer a host of side effects that include impotence, bone loss, heart trouble and obesity. But new research uncovers yet another possible downside to the ... Read more »
  • New Theory Sheds Light on Leonardo da Vinci’s Artistic Decline May 7, 2019 - SATURDAY, May 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A fainting-related fall that caused nerve damage in his right hand could explain why Leonardo da Vinci's painting skills declined later in life, a new paper suggests. The report, published as the world marks the 500th anniversary of the artist's death, contradicts the ... Read more »
  • Testosterone Supplements Not All They’re Cracked Up to Be May 7, 2019 - SATURDAY, May 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Buyer beware: When it comes to testosterone supplements, men should know a new study finds there is precious little evidence to support claims they will boost testosterone levels, sex drive, strength and overall energy. To come to this conclusion, the researchers first broke ... Read more »
  • Health Tip: What to Expect From a Gynecologist Visit May 4, 2019 - (HealthDay News) -- Visiting a gynecologist is important for women to maintain reproductive and sexual health. Most females should begin seeing a gynecologist at the age of 21, or earlier if they are sexually active, says the University of California at Santa Barbara. Women should expect the following at a ... Read more »
  • Health Tip: Signs of Hemorrhoids May 4, 2019 - (HealthDay News) -- Hemorrhoids are swollen veins in the rectum. Also known as piles, hemorrhoids affect an estimated three of four adults, says Mayo Clinic. Signs of hemorrhoids include: Bleeding during bowel movements. Itching or irritation in the anal region. Pain or discomfort. Anal swelling. A lump near the anus. ... Read more »
  • Health Highlights: May 3, 2019 May 4, 2019 - Pharmaceutical Exec Convicted of Bribing Doctors to Prescribe Opioid Spray Trump Drug Plan Will Cost Taxpayers $177 Billion: Report Starbucks Coffee Presses Recalled Breast Implants Linked to Cancer Can Still be Sold in U.S.: FDA
  • The Surprising Benefits of Weekend Workouts May 4, 2019 - FRIDAY, May 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- You know the value of exercise for maintaining good health and managing chronic conditions like arthritis, but you also know how hard it is to fit daily workouts into a busy schedule to meet weekly minimums. As an alternative, many people try to ... Read more »
  • Mental Prep for Better Performance May 4, 2019 - FRIDAY, May 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- "Get your head in the game!" Coaches say it to players all the time to get them to focus. The same advice can help you be more enthusiastic about your workouts. Here are five ideas: 1. Set both short-term and long-term goals based ... Read more »
  • As Finals Draw Near, College Kids’ Diets Worsen May 4, 2019 - FRIDAY, May 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Up all night, stressing out, feeling pressured. Cramming for college finals can bring all that, plus have students reaching for fatty, sugary foods, a new study suggests. "Stress has long been implicated in poor diet. People tend to report overeating and comfort eating ... Read more »
  • How to Know If Your PMS Is Something More Serious May 4, 2019 - FRIDAY, May 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A severe and potentially disabling form of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) affects up to 5% of women of childbearing age, an expert says. Like PMS, premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) may cause bloating, breast tenderness, fatigue and changes in sleep and eating habits. In PMDD, ... Read more »
  • AHA News: Should You Be Worried About Blood-Hungry ‘Kissing Bugs’? May 4, 2019 - FRIDAY, May 3, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- It sounds like something out of a horror film: A blood-hungry insect feeds on its prey's faces while they sleep, leaving behind a parasite that can cause stroke and heart disease. But the triatomine, or so-called "kissing bug," is all too ... Read more »
  • For People With Autism, Encounters With Police Can Turn Dangerous May 4, 2019 - FRIDAY, May 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Being stopped and questioned by a police officer can be a stressful encounter for anyone, but it is especially hazardous for those with autism. Things can go so wrong that the person with autism winds up in jail because of miscommunications and misunderstandings. ... Read more »
  • Developmental Tests Might Spot Autism at Even Younger Ages May 4, 2019 - FRIDAY, May 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The sooner a child with autism is diagnosed, the better, and now new research describes a novel way of catching it earlier than ever. Well-child visits that include developmental screening might pick up the first hints of autism risk in some children, the ... Read more »
  • AHA News: Regular Low-Level Radiation Exposure Raises High Blood Pressure Risk May 4, 2019 - FRIDAY, May 3, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Prolonged exposure to low-dose radiation -- like the type emitted by X-ray machines and CT scanners -- can increase the risk of developing high blood pressure, a key contributor to heart disease and stroke, a new study has found. Researchers examined ... Read more »
  • About 1 in 1,000 Babies Born ‘Intersex,’ Study Finds May 4, 2019 - FRIDAY, May 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Cases in which a newborn's genitals make it unclear whether the child is a boy or girl may be more common than once believed, researchers say. One example of what's known as ambiguous genitalia is a baby girl with an enlarged clitoris that ... Read more »
  • Could Common Heart Meds Lower Prostate Cancer Risk? May 4, 2019 - FRIDAY, May 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Good news for men: That blood pressure medication you're taking might be doing double duty, helping reduce your risk of developing prostate cancer, a new study shows. Researchers found that a beta blocker called atenolol cut men's risk of intermediate-grade prostate cancer about ... Read more »
  • Breast Surgeons’ Group Issues New Mammogram Guidelines May 4, 2019 - FRIDAY, May 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The largest organization representing U.S. breast surgeons is issuing new screening guidelines, advising women at average risk to begin annual mammograms at age 40. Those guidelines differ from advisories from the influential U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), which moved first mammogram screening ... Read more »
  • Trees Really Do Help Keep a City Cool, Study Shows May 4, 2019 - FRIDAY, May 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Trees are cool -- and for cities, the more, the better. That's because cities are heat islands, meaning they're significantly hotter than the rural and semi-rural areas around them. Trees help reduce this heat island effect, and the cooling effect is strongest in ... Read more »
  • HIV Meds Cut Transmission Risk to Zero, Even Without Condoms: Study May 4, 2019 - THURSDAY, May 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Even if they never use a condom during sex, gay men whose HIV is undetectable due to ongoing antiretroviral treatment cannot infect their male partner, new research reveals. "Whether men who are in monogamous relationships in these circumstances chose to use or not ... Read more »
  • Health Tip: Sensitive Teeth May 3, 2019 - (HealthDay News) -- If you wince while eating sweets or brushing your teeth, you may have sensitive teeth, says the American Dental Association. Causes of sensitive teeth include: Tooth decay. A cracked tooth. Worn tooth enamel, fillings or tooth roots. Regular dental checkups, desensitizing toothpaste and less aggressive tooth brushing ... Read more »
  • Health Tip: Chemical Peel May 3, 2019 - (HealthDay News) -- A chemical peel can reduce signs of aging and treat a variety of skin conditions, says the American Academy of Dermatology. Acne, discoloration, freckles and sun-damaged skin are some of the many conditions commonly treated with a peel. After treatment, patients often see smoother skin, a brighter ... Read more »
  • Health Highlights: May 2, 2019 May 3, 2019 - Breast Implants Linked to Cancer Can Still be Sold in U.S.: FDA Measles Case Leads to Quarantine of Cruise Ship in St. Lucia Affordable Care Act Should be Struck Down: Trump Administration Dengue Vaccine Approved by FDA
  • Could You Be Short on Vitamin B12? May 3, 2019 - THURSDAY, May 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- In the ABCs of vitamins, B12 is often overlooked. But it's essential for the making of nerve and red blood cells, as well as DNA along with many other body processes. Adults and teens need just 2.4 micrograms a day, but you can ... Read more »
  • An Expert’s Guide to Healthier Grocery Shopping May 3, 2019 - THURSDAY, May 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Living well starts at the grocery store: When you choose the right foods, it's easy to cook and eat healthfully. As a general rule, shop mostly along the perimeter of the store. This is where you'll find fresh foods, such as the dairy, ... Read more »
  • Morning Exercise Kick-Starts Seniors’ Brains May 3, 2019 - THURSDAY, May 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Want a quick brain boost? A morning session of exercise and short walks throughout the day provide a number of brain benefits for older adults, a new study says. The findings show that people should avoid uninterrupted sitting to maintain good mental function ... Read more »
  • Most Americans Hit Hard by Medical Bills May 3, 2019 - THURSDAY, May 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly 6 in 10 Americans say they have suffered financial hardship due to health care costs, a new study finds. Researchers from the American Cancer Society looked at three different types of problems: difficulty paying medical bills, worrying about bills, and delaying or ... Read more »
  • AHA News: The Often-Overlooked Connection Between Sleep Troubles and Stroke May 3, 2019 - THURSDAY, May 2, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Getting a good night's sleep can be difficult for many, but restful slumber can be especially hard for stroke survivors. And although various studies have examined the association, doctors continue to overlook the interplay between sleep disorders and stroke, finds a ... Read more »
  • Red Tape Means Many Cancer Patients Get Radiation Treatments Late May 3, 2019 - THURSDAY, May 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When you are fighting cancer, time is of the essence, but new research shows that insurance approvals for lifesaving radiation treatment are often delayed. The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) surveyed nearly 700 radiation oncologists and found that 93% said prior authorization-related ... Read more »
  • Diet Sodas May Not Help Kids Cut Calories May 3, 2019 - THURSDAY, May 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Kids who favor diet sodas over sugary ones don't consume fewer calories over the course of a day, a new study finds. And they average 200 more calories daily than their peers who choose water, according to the results of a survey of ... Read more »
  • Was Dyslexia the Secret to Leonardo da Vinci’s Greatness? May 3, 2019 - THURSDAY, May 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Leonardo da Vinci was an atrocious speller, a sure sign of dyslexia, but it's possible that very disorder fueled his genius, a researcher says. May 2 marks the 500th anniversary of the death of da Vinci, an inventor and artist regarded by many ... Read more »
  • Device Spots Lymphedema Early in Breast Cancer Patients, to Help Stop It May 3, 2019 - THURSDAY, May 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- An easy-to-use, noninvasive device can detect early signs of the cancer complication known as lymphedema, a new study reports. Lymphedema is the buildup of fluid in the body's tissues when a part of the lymph system is damaged, as can happen in cancer ... Read more »
  • Not Just Opioids: Deaths Tied to Cocaine, Meth Are Soaring, Too May 3, 2019 - THURSDAY, May 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As the United States battles an ongoing epidemic of opioid abuse and deaths, new data shows that fatalities tied to cocaine and methamphetamines are also surging. In fact, of the more than 70,000 lives lost to drug overdoses in 2017, "nearly a third ... Read more »
  • ‘Ringing in the Ears’ May Drive Some to the Brink of Suicide May 3, 2019 - THURSDAY, May 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Imagine a ringing in your ears so intense and unrelenting that you become desperate enough to try to kill yourself. That is a reality for some -- women in particular -- who suffer from severe tinnitus, new research shows. The survey of 72,000 ... Read more »
  • A Heart-Healthy Prescription for America’s Food System May 3, 2019 - THURSDAY, May 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- An overhaul of the U.S. food system is needed so Americans can easily choose healthy foods, claims an advisory from the American Heart Association (AHA). "Innovation in the food system is needed at multiple levels -- the food industry, agricultural industry, public health ... Read more »
  • Gene Therapy May Help Fight Tough-to-Treat Blood Cancer May 3, 2019 - WEDNESDAY, May 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A gene therapy that tweaks the immune system might offer hope to people with blood cancer that has resisted standard treatments, a new preliminary trial suggests. The cancer, called multiple myeloma, arises in certain white blood cells. It is currently incurable, but there ... Read more »
  • Health Tip: Understanding Breast Biopsy May 2, 2019 - (HealthDay News) -- A doctor may call for a breast biopsy when he or she is suspicious about an area of the breast. A breast biopsy is a test that includes removal of tissue or fluid. The removed cells are then examined to check for breast cancer. Typically, the procedure ... Read more »